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Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari - Dual Format Edit...
14,99 € *
zzgl. 1,49 € Versand

One of the most iconic masterpieces in cinema history, Robert Wiene's Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari shook filmgoers worldwide and changed the direction of the art form. Now presented in a definitive restoration, the film's chilling, radically expressionist vision is set to grip viewers again. At a local carnival in a small German town, hypnotist Dr. Caligari presents the somnambulist Cesare, who can purportedly predict the future of curious fairgoers. But at night, the doctor wakes Cesare from his sleep to enact his evil bidding...Incalculably influential, the film's nightmarishly jagged sets, sinister atmospheric and psychological emphasis left an immediate impact in its wake (horror, film noir, and gothic cinema would all be shaped directly by it). But this diabolical tale nevertheless stands alone - now more mesmerising than ever in this new Dual-Format special edition. Special Features: Brand new and exclusive audio commentary by historian David Kalat Caligari: The Birth of Horror in the First World War - a new 52-minute documentary on the cultural and historical context of the film You Must Become Caligari - a new video essay by David Cairns On The Restoration - three short video pieces on the film's restoration Theatrical trailer for 2014 reissue Plus: A 56-page booklet with new writing, reprints and rare archival imagery

Anbieter: Zavvi
Stand: 05.12.2020
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Peter Weir's 'The Truman Show': The ultimate hi...
25,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Communications - Movies and Television, grade: 1,0 (A), Technical University of Braunschweig (English Seminar), course: HS Documentary Film, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Through a spy hole in a bathroom cabinet we see a man in pajamas talking to himself in the mirror. Or is he talking to us? After a while, we hear a voice of a woman, telling him that he will be late. With a sigh, the man turns around and leaves the bathroom. On a black screen, we read 'Day 10, 909'- then we see the man through another spy hole, dressed in a business suit, leaving his house for work. He greets his neighbors with a wide grin, and the neighbors enthusiastically greet back. As he adds 'Oh, and in case I don't see ye: Good afternoon, good evening and good night!', they react as though they think this was extremely funny. When the dog of his next-door neighbor comes to greet him, the man freezes, on his face an expression of terror. He waits till the dog moves back and is about to get in his car when the camera suddenly pans and we see a theatrical light falling out of the sunny sky. Suspiciously, the man goes to examine what has crashed down on the street in front of his house. He does not know what to think of the light, which has a tag on it, designating it as 'Sirius'. In disbelief, he gazes into the sky- is this how stars look like?The man is called Truman Burbank, and we are watching Peter Weir's movie The Truman Show (1998). The movie is not a typical feature film as it mixes feature film elements and docu-soap elements. By confronting his audience with elements of its daily TV-programming, the docu-soap, Peter Weir establishes a satire of the media that leaves its viewers with the uneasy feeling that reality is not always what it appears to be.This work gives a short summary of the movie, as well as it depicts its style and structure. Furthermore, Peter Weir's thematic concerns are explained. The author describes docu-soaps and their appeal in order to explain which features of the docu-soap we can find in The Truman Show. The different levels of reality in the movie and the role of the audiences, that is, the tension between the perception of the viewers of the TV show inside the movie and the perception of the movie audience is another topic that is dealt with.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
Nerves in Patterns on a Screen
31,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Movies offer us images (and usually sounds) that 'thr[ow our] nerves in patterns on a screen' (Eliot). In other words, they express the neurological hyperactivity of modern subjects. Films are affect machines, in this respect. Each has its own heartbeat (narrative highs and lows), dramatic expansions and contractions (montage), and changing patterns and light (cinematography). Viewers engage with these affect machines viscerally, such that we are like Charlie Chaplin who dives into the machine in Modern Times. As we move through these affect machines we identify with some characters and empathize with others and, in the process, engage in something dynamic and experiential. When the credits roll and the lights go up, we find ourselves suddenly out of this affect machine and, in many cases, restored, rejuvinated, ready to face (and/or challenge) the world again. In its overdetermined status as a modern art form generated by modern technologies and focused on modern dilemmas (even if the narrative takes place in ancient times, the themes are translated in ways that engage modern viewers), cinema exists in a web-like, rhizomic relationship with modernity. Rhizomes are like converging root systems all tangled together. They are non-hierarchical but interrelated in 'random, unregulated networks in which any element may be connected with any other element' (Bogue 107). Films are, themselves, rhizomes of form and content. In addition, they are rhizomes that not only arise out of modernity but also interact with modernity and within individuals in extended web-like relationships. The following chapters looks at films that have made impacts both in the history of film and, more broadly, in historical events of the Twentieth Century. Each chapter explores the ways in which modernity (the socio-historical, economic, and cultural context of the films) intersects with film content (character, plot, and various mise-en-scène elements that are part of the film's narrative) and with cinematic form (camera angles, shot types, editing, lighting, sound, and other cinematic elements that are not part of the story itself) in web-like, rhizomic relationships. The chapters are organized diachronically, for the most part, following the evolution of cinematic form from 1895 to the present. At the same time, each chapter will consider the diachronic (across linear time) dynamic whereby films influenced their time and vice-versa. By looking at the way audience's own understanding of characters or events were (and continue to be) influenced by, for instance, German Expressionistic settings or Russian Formalist montage, we can learn a lot about how subjects were (and continue to be) 'directed' to see the world and to view themselves in it. By honing this ability to view films critically and consciously through a study of over 20 important films produced from 1895-2013, we can begin to identify the elements that have made film among the most powerful art forms of the 20th century. Table of Contents Introduction Chapter 1 Arts of Exposure: From Still Photography to Way Down East Chapter 2 German Expressionism and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari: Chapter 3 Irrational Exuberance and the American Dream in Post-WWI American Melodrama: The Kid and The Jazz Singer Chapter 4 Formalism and Surrealism: Exposing Cuts in Battleship Potemkin and Andalusian Dog Chapter 5 From Mass Hypnosis to Mass Genocide: Triumph of the Will and Night and Fog Chapter 6 Restorative Fictions and the Convulsive Realities They Obscure: Stagecoach and Dakota 38 Chapter 7 Deep Focus in a Hall of Mirrors: The Hollow Core of Citizen Kane Chapter 8 Double Vision: The Truth about Lies in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt and Maya Deren's Meshes in the Afternoon Chapter 9 Melodrama and Modernism: Chapter 10 Mirrors and Masks in Cléo from 5-7 and Black Girl Chapter 11 (Mis)representations and (Re)presentations of Race in Crash and 12 Years a Slave

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
People's Party
12,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Marc Milllett, an intelligent, well traveled, young professor of political science at Stanton University, has spent four years researching the evolution of the U.S. political system into its present day, voter-unresponsive state ('The Project'). His research shows that voter apathy has grown alarmingly - more than 52 % of those eligible do not vote. In order to find the cause of this disenchantment he has arranged to monitor the campaigns of the major candidates in the upcoming presidential election - one of which is Senator Harry Stennis. Harry is a charismatic fourth generation Texan with more than enough money to self-finance his independent party campaign ('The People's Party'). He is driven by a strong need to give back by returning the government to the people. Harry has selected a young go-getter campaign manager, Jerry Hogan, who is committed to running a campaign based on serving the needs of the voters by promising to deal with the real issues. Marc and Harry gradually develop a personal relationship which blossoms into an invitation to appear on national TV as part of a town meeting Q&A session set up by Jerry Hogan. After assuring himself that his part will be limited to explaining The Project Marc accepts and he scores with the viewers. Because of his stage presence and the recognized need for The Project he becomes a sought after talk show guest and a beacon of hope to the disenchanted voters. Harry's main competitor is Republican Senator Claude Hankings, a self made man from rural Ohio. Claude's campaign is based on giving something to get something. He has an old-school Washington campaign manager who knows who to give it to and what to get back. Claude easily wins his primaries and leads by 8 points in the polls with only 10 days left before the vote. The only options which would give Harry an outside chance to pull off an upset win are: to make a deal with the big labor unions and accept the strings attached which would violate his campaign pledge to the voters; or, to make a last ditch, all-out effort to motivate those disenchanted non-voters. After much soul searching, Harry decides to make a sincere appeal to the apathetic non-voters and try to convince them that if they voted for The People's Party they would be electing a government 'of the people, by the people and for the people'. Jerry Hogan has saved three ten minute national TV slots for a final push. Harry uses those slots to explain his reasons for running; to introduce his selection of those who would serve as his cabinet members; and to let the man he has selected as a running mate speak for himself. At noon on voting day, Claude Hankings leads by 4%. Harry and his team Can only wait and watch as the TV reports the vote count. 'The People's Party' is a timely novel factually portraying how the U.S. arrived at today's broken electoral system which produces governments answering to the moneyed special interests groups rather than the will of the voters. It is factual enough to be believed and entertaining enough to be enjoyed

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
Peter Weir's 'The Truman Show': The ultimate hi...
15,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Communications - Movies and Television, grade: 1,0 (A), Technical University of Braunschweig (English Seminar), course: HS Documentary Film, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Through a spy hole in a bathroom cabinet we see a man in pajamas talking to himself in the mirror. Or is he talking to us? After a while, we hear a voice of a woman, telling him that he will be late. With a sigh, the man turns around and leaves the bathroom. On a black screen, we read 'Day 10, 909'- then we see the man through another spy hole, dressed in a business suit, leaving his house for work. He greets his neighbors with a wide grin, and the neighbors enthusiastically greet back. As he adds 'Oh, and in case I don't see ye: Good afternoon, good evening and good night!', they react as though they think this was extremely funny. When the dog of his next-door neighbor comes to greet him, the man freezes, on his face an expression of terror. He waits till the dog moves back and is about to get in his car when the camera suddenly pans and we see a theatrical light falling out of the sunny sky. Suspiciously, the man goes to examine what has crashed down on the street in front of his house. He does not know what to think of the light, which has a tag on it, designating it as 'Sirius'. In disbelief, he gazes into the sky- is this how stars look like? The man is called Truman Burbank, and we are watching Peter Weir's movie The Truman Show (1998). The movie is not a typical feature film as it mixes feature film elements and docu-soap elements. By confronting his audience with elements of its daily TV-programming, the docu-soap, Peter Weir establishes a satire of the media that leaves its viewers with the uneasy feeling that reality is not always what it appears to be. This work gives a short summary of the movie, as well as it depicts its style and structure. Furthermore, Peter Weir's thematic concerns are explained. The author describes docu-soaps and their appeal in order to explain which features of the docu-soap we can find in The Truman Show. The different levels of reality in the movie and the role of the audiences, that is, the tension between the perception of the viewers of the TV show inside the movie and the perception of the movie audience is another topic that is dealt with.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
Peter Weir's 'The Truman Show': The ultimate hi...
15,50 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Communications - Movies and Television, grade: 1,0 (A), Technical University of Braunschweig (English Seminar), course: HS Documentary Film, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Through a spy hole in a bathroom cabinet we see a man in pajamas talking to himself in the mirror. Or is he talking to us? After a while, we hear a voice of a woman, telling him that he will be late. With a sigh, the man turns around and leaves the bathroom. On a black screen, we read 'Day 10, 909'- then we see the man through another spy hole, dressed in a business suit, leaving his house for work. He greets his neighbors with a wide grin, and the neighbors enthusiastically greet back. As he adds 'Oh, and in case I don't see ye: Good afternoon, good evening and good night!', they react as though they think this was extremely funny. When the dog of his next-door neighbor comes to greet him, the man freezes, on his face an expression of terror. He waits till the dog moves back and is about to get in his car when the camera suddenly pans and we see a theatrical light falling out of the sunny sky. Suspiciously, the man goes to examine what has crashed down on the street in front of his house. He does not know what to think of the light, which has a tag on it, designating it as 'Sirius'. In disbelief, he gazes into the sky- is this how stars look like?The man is called Truman Burbank, and we are watching Peter Weir's movie The Truman Show (1998). The movie is not a typical feature film as it mixes feature film elements and docu-soap elements. By confronting his audience with elements of its daily TV-programming, the docu-soap, Peter Weir establishes a satire of the media that leaves its viewers with the uneasy feeling that reality is not always what it appears to be.This work gives a short summary of the movie, as well as it depicts its style and structure. Furthermore, Peter Weir's thematic concerns are explained. The author describes docu-soaps and their appeal in order to explain which features of the docu-soap we can find in The Truman Show. The different levels of reality in the movie and the role of the audiences, that is, the tension between the perception of the viewers of the TV show inside the movie and the perception of the movie audience is another topic that is dealt with.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
People's Party
10,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Marc Milllett, an intelligent, well traveled, young professor of political science at Stanton University, has spent four years researching the evolution of the U.S. political system into its present day, voter-unresponsive state ('The Project'). His research shows that voter apathy has grown alarmingly - more than 52 % of those eligible do not vote. In order to find the cause of this disenchantment he has arranged to monitor the campaigns of the major candidates in the upcoming presidential election - one of which is Senator Harry Stennis. Harry is a charismatic fourth generation Texan with more than enough money to self-finance his independent party campaign ('The People's Party'). He is driven by a strong need to give back by returning the government to the people. Harry has selected a young go-getter campaign manager, Jerry Hogan, who is committed to running a campaign based on serving the needs of the voters by promising to deal with the real issues. Marc and Harry gradually develop a personal relationship which blossoms into an invitation to appear on national TV as part of a town meeting Q&A session set up by Jerry Hogan. After assuring himself that his part will be limited to explaining The Project Marc accepts and he scores with the viewers. Because of his stage presence and the recognized need for The Project he becomes a sought after talk show guest and a beacon of hope to the disenchanted voters. Harry's main competitor is Republican Senator Claude Hankings, a self made man from rural Ohio. Claude's campaign is based on giving something to get something. He has an old-school Washington campaign manager who knows who to give it to and what to get back. Claude easily wins his primaries and leads by 8 points in the polls with only 10 days left before the vote. The only options which would give Harry an outside chance to pull off an upset win are: to make a deal with the big labor unions and accept the strings attached which would violate his campaign pledge to the voters; or, to make a last ditch, all-out effort to motivate those disenchanted non-voters. After much soul searching, Harry decides to make a sincere appeal to the apathetic non-voters and try to convince them that if they voted for The People's Party they would be electing a government 'of the people, by the people and for the people'. Jerry Hogan has saved three ten minute national TV slots for a final push. Harry uses those slots to explain his reasons for running; to introduce his selection of those who would serve as his cabinet members; and to let the man he has selected as a running mate speak for himself. At noon on voting day, Claude Hankings leads by 4%. Harry and his team Can only wait and watch as the TV reports the vote count. 'The People's Party' is a timely novel factually portraying how the U.S. arrived at today's broken electoral system which produces governments answering to the moneyed special interests groups rather than the will of the voters. It is factual enough to be believed and entertaining enough to be enjoyed

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
Nerves in Patterns on a Screen
27,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Movies offer us images (and usually sounds) that 'thr[ow our] nerves in patterns on a screen' (Eliot). In other words, they express the neurological hyperactivity of modern subjects. Films are affect machines, in this respect. Each has its own heartbeat (narrative highs and lows), dramatic expansions and contractions (montage), and changing patterns and light (cinematography). Viewers engage with these affect machines viscerally, such that we are like Charlie Chaplin who dives into the machine in Modern Times. As we move through these affect machines we identify with some characters and empathize with others and, in the process, engage in something dynamic and experiential. When the credits roll and the lights go up, we find ourselves suddenly out of this affect machine and, in many cases, restored, rejuvinated, ready to face (and/or challenge) the world again. In its overdetermined status as a modern art form generated by modern technologies and focused on modern dilemmas (even if the narrative takes place in ancient times, the themes are translated in ways that engage modern viewers), cinema exists in a web-like, rhizomic relationship with modernity. Rhizomes are like converging root systems all tangled together. They are non-hierarchical but interrelated in 'random, unregulated networks in which any element may be connected with any other element' (Bogue 107). Films are, themselves, rhizomes of form and content. In addition, they are rhizomes that not only arise out of modernity but also interact with modernity and within individuals in extended web-like relationships. The following chapters looks at films that have made impacts both in the history of film and, more broadly, in historical events of the Twentieth Century. Each chapter explores the ways in which modernity (the socio-historical, economic, and cultural context of the films) intersects with film content (character, plot, and various mise-en-scène elements that are part of the film's narrative) and with cinematic form (camera angles, shot types, editing, lighting, sound, and other cinematic elements that are not part of the story itself) in web-like, rhizomic relationships. The chapters are organized diachronically, for the most part, following the evolution of cinematic form from 1895 to the present. At the same time, each chapter will consider the diachronic (across linear time) dynamic whereby films influenced their time and vice-versa. By looking at the way audience's own understanding of characters or events were (and continue to be) influenced by, for instance, German Expressionistic settings or Russian Formalist montage, we can learn a lot about how subjects were (and continue to be) 'directed' to see the world and to view themselves in it. By honing this ability to view films critically and consciously through a study of over 20 important films produced from 1895-2013, we can begin to identify the elements that have made film among the most powerful art forms of the 20th century. Table of Contents Introduction Chapter 1 Arts of Exposure: From Still Photography to Way Down East Chapter 2 German Expressionism and The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari: Chapter 3 Irrational Exuberance and the American Dream in Post-WWI American Melodrama: The Kid and The Jazz Singer Chapter 4 Formalism and Surrealism: Exposing Cuts in Battleship Potemkin and Andalusian Dog Chapter 5 From Mass Hypnosis to Mass Genocide: Triumph of the Will and Night and Fog Chapter 6 Restorative Fictions and the Convulsive Realities They Obscure: Stagecoach and Dakota 38 Chapter 7 Deep Focus in a Hall of Mirrors: The Hollow Core of Citizen Kane Chapter 8 Double Vision: The Truth about Lies in Alfred Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt and Maya Deren's Meshes in the Afternoon Chapter 9 Melodrama and Modernism: Chapter 10 Mirrors and Masks in Cléo from 5-7 and Black Girl Chapter 11 (Mis)representations and (Re)presentations of Race in Crash and 12 Years a Slave

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot
Peter Weir's 'The Truman Show': The ultimate hi...
12,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Communications - Movies and Television, grade: 1,0 (A), Technical University of Braunschweig (English Seminar), course: HS Documentary Film, 16 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Through a spy hole in a bathroom cabinet we see a man in pajamas talking to himself in the mirror. Or is he talking to us? After a while, we hear a voice of a woman, telling him that he will be late. With a sigh, the man turns around and leaves the bathroom. On a black screen, we read 'Day 10, 909'- then we see the man through another spy hole, dressed in a business suit, leaving his house for work. He greets his neighbors with a wide grin, and the neighbors enthusiastically greet back. As he adds 'Oh, and in case I don't see ye: Good afternoon, good evening and good night!', they react as though they think this was extremely funny. When the dog of his next-door neighbor comes to greet him, the man freezes, on his face an expression of terror. He waits till the dog moves back and is about to get in his car when the camera suddenly pans and we see a theatrical light falling out of the sunny sky. Suspiciously, the man goes to examine what has crashed down on the street in front of his house. He does not know what to think of the light, which has a tag on it, designating it as 'Sirius'. In disbelief, he gazes into the sky- is this how stars look like? The man is called Truman Burbank, and we are watching Peter Weir's movie The Truman Show (1998). The movie is not a typical feature film as it mixes feature film elements and docu-soap elements. By confronting his audience with elements of its daily TV-programming, the docu-soap, Peter Weir establishes a satire of the media that leaves its viewers with the uneasy feeling that reality is not always what it appears to be. This work gives a short summary of the movie, as well as it depicts its style and structure. Furthermore, Peter Weir's thematic concerns are explained. The author describes docu-soaps and their appeal in order to explain which features of the docu-soap we can find in The Truman Show. The different levels of reality in the movie and the role of the audiences, that is, the tension between the perception of the viewers of the TV show inside the movie and the perception of the movie audience is another topic that is dealt with.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 05.12.2020
Zum Angebot