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NASCAR on CBS
34,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! CBS Sports President Neal Pilson and motorsports editor Ken Squier believed that America would watch an entire stock car race live on television. Before 1979, television coverage of the Daytona 500 either began when the race was halfway over, or as an edited highlight packaged that aired a week later on ABC's Wide World of Sports. On February 18, 1979, CBS presented the first flag-to-flag coverage of the Daytona 500 (and 500-mile race to be broadcast live on national television in general). The Indianapolis 500 was only broadcast on tape delay that evening in this era, most races were broadcast only through the final quarter to half of the race, as was the procedure for ABC's Championship Auto Racing broadcasts, with the new CBS contract, the network and NASCAR agreed to a full live broadcast. That telecast introduced in-car and low-level track-side cameras, which has now become standard in all sorts of automotive racing broadcasts. The race drew incredible ratings, in part due to the compelling action both on and off the track, and in part because a major snowstorm on the East Coast kept millions of viewers indoors.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 10.04.2020
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Psychoanalysis and attitudes in modern advertis...
13,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject Communications - Public Relations, Advertising, Marketing, Social Media, grade: 2.0, TU Dortmund (Institut für Anglistik), course: Popular Culture: Theories and Practices, language: English, abstract: In September 2000, during the presidential election campaigns in the United States, a citizen of Seattle watched a political commercial on television. In the beginning, the commercial appeared like a usual ad in which the spokesperson commented on George W. Bush's concept concerning prescription drugs and its advantages and at the same time criticised Al Gore's concept about prescribed medication. The viewer had the impression of something being fishy about the spot. The next time he saw it on tv, he recorded it to a tape and replayed it at a very slow rate. Indeed, something was unusual about the ad: When the spokesperson said: 'Gore's plan about medical prescriptions: Bureaucrats decide', the term 'RATS' appeared for a fraction of a second on the screen - normally below the threshold of perception. The attentive viewer informed Al Gore's team about this, who proceeded to inform the press. Bush's team denied the possibility that anyone had purposefully inserted the term 'RATS' into the election spot and proclaimed that this had happened accidentally. Commercials are part of our lives. Every day, the average American is confronted with 300 - 400 adverts. Advertisement creates employment and transfers impressions about the promoted product to its recipients. Thus, advertisement has to be subliminal and obvious at the same time. Advertisers exploit people's attitudes and try to change the viewer's self-perception. My thesis is that commercials create wishes that did not exist before or at least did not exist in the same way in the viewers' minds. They use subliminal and obvious messages to attract interest for the presented object. In the following paper, I will focus on how commercials work. Using a selection of different commercials, I will concentrate on the subliminal and obvious messages contained in these spots. In terms of theoretical frameworks, I will mainly work with Freud's psychoanalysis and with theories about the symbolic values of dreams to examine the subliminal aspects in advertising. Concerning the obvious messages in advertising, I will concentrate on culturally defined attitudes, and demonstrate how oponions are used and changed by marketing. In a final conclusion, I will sum up my results and give an outlook on possible fields of further investigation.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.04.2020
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Delaware-Designin'in the Rain
49,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Delaware is, by their own definition, a 'Japanese supersonic group [that] designs-rocks and rocks-designs. 'They also call themselves 'Artoonists.' Since 1993, the collaborative has displayed their retro-futurism across a range of contemporary products, including music CDs. CD-ROMs, commercials, magazines, T-shirts, websites, live shows, and mobile phones. Delaware is four Masato Samata, tape recordist, vocalist, lyricist, composer, art director, and designer; Aya Honda, bassist, vocalist, composer, and designer; Morihiro Tajiri, guitarist, bassist, drummer, vocalist, composer, and recordist; and Yoshiki Watanabe, guitarist, vocalist, sound programmer, phone ringer, and composer. Their style, a mixture of music and graphic design, has surprised audiences and viewers around the world, from New York to Barcelona to Tokyo (or the other way around). At Mac Expo'98, they played a live audio-visual show with eight projectors. In early 2001, they mounted the first-ever 'mobile gallery' show on Japanese mobile telephones. In summer 2001, a live show and graphic works were presented at P.S.1 in New York. In spring 2002, their graphic works appeared in 'JaPan Graphics in Barcelona. This January, they released their fifth and sixth albums, 'dELAwArE_S+rikeS_bAcK and 'AmeN. And all of it inspired by Chuck Berry. Venus de Milo, and haiku.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 10.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Psychoanalysis and attitudes in modern advertis...
8,30 € *
zzgl. 3,00 € Versand

Seminar paper from the year 2009 in the subject Communications - Public Relations, Advertising, Marketing, Social Media, grade: 2.0, TU Dortmund (Institut für Anglistik), course: Popular Culture: Theories and Practices, language: English, abstract: In September 2000, during the presidential election campaigns in the United States, a citizen of Seattle watched a political commercial on television. In the beginning, the commercial appeared like a usual ad in which the spokesperson commented on George W. Bush's concept concerning prescription drugs and its advantages and at the same time criticised Al Gore's concept about prescribed medication. The viewer had the impression of something being fishy about the spot. The next time he saw it on tv, he recorded it to a tape and replayed it at a very slow rate. Indeed, something was unusual about the ad: When the spokesperson said: 'Gore's plan about medical prescriptions: Bureaucrats decide', the term 'RATS' appeared for a fraction of a second on the screen - normally below the threshold of perception. The attentive viewer informed Al Gore's team about this, who proceeded to inform the press. Bush's team denied the possibility that anyone had purposefully inserted the term 'RATS' into the election spot and proclaimed that this had happened accidentally. Commercials are part of our lives. Every day, the average American is confronted with 300 - 400 adverts. Advertisement creates employment and transfers impressions about the promoted product to its recipients. Thus, advertisement has to be subliminal and obvious at the same time. Advertisers exploit people's attitudes and try to change the viewer's self-perception. My thesis is that commercials create wishes that did not exist before or at least did not exist in the same way in the viewers' minds. They use subliminal and obvious messages to attract interest for the presented object. In the following paper, I will focus on how commercials work. Using a selection of different commercials, I will concentrate on the subliminal and obvious messages contained in these spots. In terms of theoretical frameworks, I will mainly work with Freud's psychoanalysis and with theories about the symbolic values of dreams to examine the subliminal aspects in advertising. Concerning the obvious messages in advertising, I will concentrate on culturally defined attitudes, and demonstrate how oponions are used and changed by marketing. In a final conclusion, I will sum up my results and give an outlook on possible fields of further investigation.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 10.04.2020
Zum Angebot
Delaware-Designin'in the Rain
36,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Delaware is, by their own definition, a 'Japanese supersonic group [that] designs-rocks and rocks-designs. 'They also call themselves 'Artoonists.' Since 1993, the collaborative has displayed their retro-futurism across a range of contemporary products, including music CDs. CD-ROMs, commercials, magazines, T-shirts, websites, live shows, and mobile phones. Delaware is four Masato Samata, tape recordist, vocalist, lyricist, composer, art director, and designer; Aya Honda, bassist, vocalist, composer, and designer; Morihiro Tajiri, guitarist, bassist, drummer, vocalist, composer, and recordist; and Yoshiki Watanabe, guitarist, vocalist, sound programmer, phone ringer, and composer. Their style, a mixture of music and graphic design, has surprised audiences and viewers around the world, from New York to Barcelona to Tokyo (or the other way around). At Mac Expo'98, they played a live audio-visual show with eight projectors. In early 2001, they mounted the first-ever 'mobile gallery' show on Japanese mobile telephones. In summer 2001, a live show and graphic works were presented at P.S.1 in New York. In spring 2002, their graphic works appeared in 'JaPan Graphics in Barcelona. This January, they released their fifth and sixth albums, 'dELAwArE_S+rikeS_bAcK and 'AmeN. And all of it inspired by Chuck Berry. Venus de Milo, and haiku.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 10.04.2020
Zum Angebot