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The Beauty of the Real: What Hollywood Can Lear...
9,95 € *
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Even as actresses become increasingly marginalized by Hollywood, French cinema is witnessing an explosion of female talent - a Golden Age unlike anything the world has seen since the days of Stanwyck, Hepburn, Davis, and Garbo. In France, the joy of acting is alive and well. Scores of French actresses are doing the best work of their lives in movies tailored to their star images and unique personalities. Yet virtually no one this side of the Atlantic even knows about them. Viewers who feel shortchanged by Hollywood will be thrilled to discover The Beauty of the Real. This book showcases a range of contemporary French actresses to an audience that will know how to appreciate them - an American public hungry for the exact qualities that these women represent. To spend time with them, to admire their flashing intelligence and fearless willingness to depict life as it is lived, gives us what we're looking for in movies but so rarely find: insights into womanhood, meditations on the dark and light aspect's of life's journey, revelations and explorations that move viewers to reflect on their own lives. The stories they bring to the screen leave us feeling renewed and excited about movies again. Based on one-on-one interviews and the viewing of numerous films, Mick LaSalle has put together a fascinating profile of recent generations of French film stars and an overview of their best work. These women's insights and words illuminate his book, which will answer once and for all the two questions Americans most often have about women and the movies: Where did all the great actresses go? And how can I see their movies? 1. Language: English. Narrator: Phil Holland. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/adbl/012619/bk_adbl_012619_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Stuntwomen: The Untold Hollywood Story , Hörbuc...
9,95 € *
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They've traded punches in knockdown brawls, crashed biplanes through barns, and raced to the rescue in fast cars. They add suspense and drama to the story, portraying the swimmer stalked by the menacing shark, the heroine dangling 20 feet below a soaring hot air balloon, or the woman leaping nine feet over a wall to escape a dog attack. Only an expert can make such feats of daring look easy, and stuntwomen with the skills to perform - and survive - great moments of action in movies have been hitting their mark in Hollywood since the beginning of film.Here, Mollie Gregory presents the first history of stuntwomen in the film industry from the silent era to the 21st century. In the early years of motion pictures, women were highly involved in all aspects of film production, but they were marginalized as movies became popular, and more important, profitable. Capable stuntwomen were replaced by men in wigs, and very few worked between the 1930s and 1960s. As late as the 1990s, men wore wigs and women's clothes to double as actresses, and were even "painted down" for some performances, while men and women of color were regularly denied stunt work.For decades, stuntwomen have faced institutional discrimination, unequal pay, and sexual harassment even as they jumped from speeding trains and raced horse-drawn carriages away from burning buildings. Featuring 65 interviews, Stuntwomen showcases the absorbing stories and uncommon courage of women who make their living planning and performing action-packed sequences that keep viewers' hearts racing. 1. Language: English. Narrator: Tanis Parenteau. Audio sample: http://samples.audible.de/bk/adbl/055017/bk_adbl_055017_sample.mp3. Digital audiobook in aax.

Anbieter: Audible
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Agnès Varda
24,69 € *
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Over nearly sixty years, Agnès Varda (b. 1928) gave interviews that are revealing not only of her work, but of her remarkably ambiguous status. She has been called the "Mother of the New Wave" but suffered for many years for never having been completely accepted by the cinematic establishment in France. Varda's first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), displayed many of the characteristics of the two later films that launched the New Wave, Truffaut's 400 Blows and Godard's Breathless. In a low-budget film, using (as yet) unknown actors and working entirely outside the prevailing studio system, Varda completely abandoned the "tradition of quality" that Truffaut was at that very time condemning in the pages of Cahiers du cinéma. Her work, however, was not "discovered" until after Truffaut and Godard had broken onto the scene in 1959. Varda's next film, Cleo from 5 to 7, attracted considerably more attention and was selected as France's official entry for the Festival in Cannes. Ultimately, however, this film and her work for the next fifty years continued to be overshadowed by her more famous male friends, many of whom she mentored and advised. Her films have finally earned recognition as deeply probing and fundamental to the growing awareness in France of women's issues and the role of women in the cinema. "I'm not philosophical," she says, "not metaphysical. Feelings are the ground on which people can be led to think about things. I try to show everything that happens in such a way and ask questions so as to leave the viewers free to make their own judgments." The panoply of interviews here emphasize her core belief that "we never stop learning" and reveal the wealth of ways to answer her questions. T. Jefferson Kline, Brookline, Massachusetts, is professor of French at Boston University. He is the author of several books, including Unraveling French Cinema: From L' Atalante to Caché, and he is coeditor of Bernardo Bertolucci: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi).Over nearly sixty years, Agnès Varda (b. 1928) gave interviews that are revealing not only of her work, but of her remarkably ambiguous status. She has been called the "Mother of the New Wave" but suffered for many years for never having been completely accepted by the cinematic establishment in France. Varda's first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), displayed many of the characteristics of the two later films that launched the New Wave, Truffaut's 400 Blows and Godard's Breathless. In a low-budget film, using (as yet) unknown actors and working entirely outside the prevailing studio system, Varda completely abandoned the "tradition of quality" that Truffaut was at that very time condemning in the pages of Cahiers du cinéma. Her work, however, was not "discovered" until after Truffaut and Godard had broken onto the scene in 1959. Varda's next film, Cleo from 5 to 7, attracted considerably more attention and was selected as France's official entry for the Festival in Cannes. Ultimately, however, this film and her work for the next fifty years continued to be overshadowed by her more famous male friends, many of whom she mentored and advised. Her films have finally earned recognition as deeply probing and fundamental to the growing awareness in France of women's issues and the role of women in the cinema. "I'm not philosophical," she says, "not metaphysical. Feelings are the ground on which people can be led to think about things. I try to show everything that happens in such a way and ask questions so as to leave the viewers free to make their own judgments." The panoply of interviews here emphasize her core belief that "we never stop learning" and reveal the wealth of ways to answer her questions. T. Jefferson Kline, Brookline, Massachusetts, is professor of French at Boston University. He is the author of several books, including Unraveling French Cinema: From L' Atalante to Caché, and he is coeditor of Bernardo Bertolucci: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi).

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Agnès Varda
24,69 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Over nearly sixty years, Agnès Varda (b. 1928) gave interviews that are revealing not only of her work, but of her remarkably ambiguous status. She has been called the "Mother of the New Wave" but suffered for many years for never having been completely accepted by the cinematic establishment in France. Varda's first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), displayed many of the characteristics of the two later films that launched the New Wave, Truffaut's 400 Blows and Godard's Breathless. In a low-budget film, using (as yet) unknown actors and working entirely outside the prevailing studio system, Varda completely abandoned the "tradition of quality" that Truffaut was at that very time condemning in the pages of Cahiers du cinéma. Her work, however, was not "discovered" until after Truffaut and Godard had broken onto the scene in 1959. Varda's next film, Cleo from 5 to 7, attracted considerably more attention and was selected as France's official entry for the Festival in Cannes. Ultimately, however, this film and her work for the next fifty years continued to be overshadowed by her more famous male friends, many of whom she mentored and advised. Her films have finally earned recognition as deeply probing and fundamental to the growing awareness in France of women's issues and the role of women in the cinema. "I'm not philosophical," she says, "not metaphysical. Feelings are the ground on which people can be led to think about things. I try to show everything that happens in such a way and ask questions so as to leave the viewers free to make their own judgments." The panoply of interviews here emphasize her core belief that "we never stop learning" and reveal the wealth of ways to answer her questions. T. Jefferson Kline, Brookline, Massachusetts, is professor of French at Boston University. He is the author of several books, including Unraveling French Cinema: From L' Atalante to Caché, and he is coeditor of Bernardo Bertolucci: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi).Over nearly sixty years, Agnès Varda (b. 1928) gave interviews that are revealing not only of her work, but of her remarkably ambiguous status. She has been called the "Mother of the New Wave" but suffered for many years for never having been completely accepted by the cinematic establishment in France. Varda's first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), displayed many of the characteristics of the two later films that launched the New Wave, Truffaut's 400 Blows and Godard's Breathless. In a low-budget film, using (as yet) unknown actors and working entirely outside the prevailing studio system, Varda completely abandoned the "tradition of quality" that Truffaut was at that very time condemning in the pages of Cahiers du cinéma. Her work, however, was not "discovered" until after Truffaut and Godard had broken onto the scene in 1959. Varda's next film, Cleo from 5 to 7, attracted considerably more attention and was selected as France's official entry for the Festival in Cannes. Ultimately, however, this film and her work for the next fifty years continued to be overshadowed by her more famous male friends, many of whom she mentored and advised. Her films have finally earned recognition as deeply probing and fundamental to the growing awareness in France of women's issues and the role of women in the cinema. "I'm not philosophical," she says, "not metaphysical. Feelings are the ground on which people can be led to think about things. I try to show everything that happens in such a way and ask questions so as to leave the viewers free to make their own judgments." The panoply of interviews here emphasize her core belief that "we never stop learning" and reveal the wealth of ways to answer her questions. T. Jefferson Kline, Brookline, Massachusetts, is professor of French at Boston University. He is the author of several books, including Unraveling French Cinema: From L' Atalante to Caché, and he is coeditor of Bernardo Bertolucci: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi).

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Stereotypes in Disney's Classics
61,90 € *
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From the days of its inception by Walt Disney, the Disney Company has been known for its classical films. Classics such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Cinderella, Mulan, Pocahontas and others, despite being inspired from universal fairy tales and folk tales, have been molded by the Disney Corporation in order to fit into the American culture. Such fact accounts for the success of Disney's classics which have become box-office hits, garnering millions of dollars for their production company and serving as a source of inspiration for Americans. Viewers of Disney's classics, who are chiefly children, are deeply affected by the gender and ethnic stereotypes encompassed in the classics. As a result, these classics turn out to be a teaching tool for children and a major means of shaping child culture, and consequently, American culture. This study, equally, shows how the gender and ethnic stereotypes embedded in Disney's classics serve as symbols of their times and stand witness to cultural trends like consumerism, patriarchy, the Sexual Revolution, the Women's Liberation Movement, the melting pot ideology and multiculturalism.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Black Women in Reality Television Docusoaps
131,10 € *
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Black Women in Reality Television Docusoaps explores representations of Black women in one of the most powerful, popular forms of reality television - the docusoap. Viewers, critics, and researchers have taken issue with what they consider to be unflattering, one-dimensional representations. This book discusses images of Black women in reality television during the 2011 viewing year, when much criticism arose. These findings provide a context for a more recent examination of reality television portrayals during 2014, following many reality stars' promises to offer new representations. The authors discuss the types of images shown, potential readings of such portrayals, and the implication of these reality television docusoap presentations. The book will be useful for courses examining topics such as popular culture, mass media and society, women's studies, race and media, sex and gender, media studies, African American issues in mass communication, and gender, race and representation, as well as other graduate-level classes.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Black Women in Reality Television Docusoaps
34,10 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Black Women in Reality Television Docusoaps explores representations of Black women in one of the most powerful, popular forms of reality television - the docusoap. Viewers, critics, and researchers have taken issue with what they consider to be unflattering, one-dimensional representations. This book discusses images of Black women in reality television during the 2011 viewing year, when much criticism arose. These findings provide a context for a more recent examination of reality television portrayals during 2014, following many reality stars' promises to offer new representations. The authors discuss the types of images shown, potential readings of such portrayals, and the implication of these reality television docusoap presentations. The book will be useful for courses examining topics such as popular culture, mass media and society, women's studies, race and media, sex and gender, media studies, African American issues in mass communication, and gender, race and representation, as well as other graduate-level classes.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 18.09.2020
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Dismantling the Dream Factory: Gender, German C...
53,90 CHF *
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...convincing in its arguments, Baer's Dismantling the Dream Factory is a nicely structured work that offers a good mixture of historiography and close analysis. Baer effectively draws on contemporary press and advertising materials to highlight extradiegetic discourses surrounding the films, particularly to show how they made their appeals to female viewers. Baer's book is clearly and accessibly written, making it equally useful for teaching purposes and for more advanced scholars of German cinema. German Quarterly Baer has written an original critical view of German cinema after WWII...Unique to this study is Baer's attempt to ground her inquiry in gender theory...The result is a book that reopens the era by examining it from a fresh angle. Baer supports this important study with well-chosen stills. Choice This is a great book, well grounded in the critical literature and contemporary archival sources. The author has an extraordinary eye for detail in her close readings of the films and a profound understanding of the interplay between the diegetic and extra-diegetic elements that make up the meaning of a given film text, as she ranges from discussion of the use of sound to the marketing strategies employed to sell the films under investigation, all of which is located in a detailed understanding of the broader historical context and the German 'national trauma' of the time. Scope ...[a] fascinating study...[that] makes a major contribution to a burgeoning field dedicated to the investigation of what was once dismissed. Monatshefte ...makes a significant and original contribution, is well researched as well as written, and would lend itself conveniently to the teaching of any of these films...[It] bring[s] to bear theories from Anglo-American film studies as well as German cultural studies and history. The result is a felicitous mixture of theory, cultural-historical context, and informed film readings. Jaimey Fisher, University of California, Davis The history of postwar German cinema has most often been told as a story of failure, a failure paradoxically epitomized by the remarkable popularity of film throughout the late 1940s and 1950s. Through the analysis of 10 representative films, Hester Baer reassesses this period, looking in particular at how the attempt to 'dismantle the dream factory' of Nazi entertainment cinema resulted in a new cinematic language which developed as a result of the changing audience demographic. In an era when female viewers comprised 70 per cent of cinema audiences a 'women's cinema' emerged, which sought to appeal to female spectators through its genres, star choices, stories and formal conventions. In addition to analyzing the formal language and narrative content of these films, Baer uses a wide array of other sources to reconstruct the original context of their reception, including promotional and publicity materials, film programs, censorship documents, reviews and spreads in fan magazines. This book presents a new take on an essential period, which saw the rebirth of German cinema after its thorough delegitimization under the Nazi regime. Hester Baer is Associate Professor of German and Women's & Gender Studies at the University of Oklahoma, where she is also on the faculty of the Film & Media Studies program. She has published widely on German cinema, feminism, and women's writing.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.09.2020
Zum Angebot
Agnès Varda
53,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Over nearly sixty years, Agnès Varda (b. 1928) gave interviews that are revealing not only of her work, but of her remarkably ambiguous status. She has been called the 'Mother of the New Wave' but suffered for many years for never having been completely accepted by the cinematic establishment in France. Varda's first film, La Pointe Courte (1954), displayed many of the characteristics of the two later films that launched the New Wave, Truffaut's 400 Blows and Godard's Breathless. In a low-budget film, using (as yet) unknown actors and working entirely outside the prevailing studio system, Varda completely abandoned the 'tradition of quality' that Truffaut was at that very time condemning in the pages of Cahiers du cinéma. Her work, however, was not 'discovered' until after Truffaut and Godard had broken onto the scene in 1959. Varda's next film, Cleo from 5 to 7, attracted considerably more attention and was selected as France's official entry for the Festival in Cannes. Ultimately, however, this film and her work for the next fifty years continued to be overshadowed by her more famous male friends, many of whom she mentored and advised. Her films have finally earned recognition as deeply probing and fundamental to the growing awareness in France of women's issues and the role of women in the cinema. 'I'm not philosophical,' she says, 'not metaphysical. Feelings are the ground on which people can be led to think about things. I try to show everything that happens in such a way and ask questions so as to leave the viewers free to make their own judgments.' The panoply of interviews here emphasize her core belief that 'we never stop learning' and reveal the wealth of ways to answer her questions. T. Jefferson Kline, Brookline, Massachusetts, is professor of French at Boston University. He is the author of several books, including Unraveling French Cinema: From L' Atalante to Caché, and he is coeditor of Bernardo Bertolucci: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi).

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 18.09.2020
Zum Angebot